Archive for the ‘Around The Net’ Category

When Hollywood Leading Men Cry

Sometimes the simplest ideas are the most profound. Photographer Sam Taylor-Wood‘s project “Crying Men” consists of images of celebrities, all men, simply sobbing. In one way or another, the subject of each photo is a masculine figure, making the heartbreak etched in the faces of those who were able to summon a memory painful enough to elicit a convincing reaction all the more poignant.

According to Wood:

“Some of the men cried before I even finished loading the camera, but others found it really difficult. People can decide for themselves which they think are the authentic tears and which they think are fake. It’s about the idea of taking these big, masculine men and showing a different side.”

Here are my absolute favorites:

Click HERE & HERE for more!

Nightmare Photography

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WARNING!
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Do not, I repeat, do not scroll further down if you have a weak heart or get terrified easily. The following photographs are exceptionally bloodcurdling and can easily awaken your dormant childhood nightmares. You’ve been warned!

Photographer Joshua Hoffine takes pictures of the things we all love to hate: nightmares. There’s a wide array of horrors in his online portfolio but the selected images below are easily favorites of mine since they awfully resonate to my own childhood nightmares . According to Joshua:

I believe that the horror story is ultimately concerned with the imminence and randomness of death, and the implication that there is no certainty to existence. The experience of horror resides in this confrontation with uncertainty. Horror tells is that our belief in security is delusional, and that monsters are all around us.

Don’t Look Under The Bad!

Don’t Go Downstairs!

Don’t Open The Fridge!

CLICK HERE FOR MORE

Death & Beauty In The Eyes Of The Photographer

The following paragraph and photo was submitted by a photographer named Enrique Metinides from Viceland.com. I should warn you that the picture is a little bit explicit, so read and gawk at your own risk:

This picture was taken on Avenida Chapultepec and Calle de Monterrey in Colonia Roma. She was a very famous journalist who wrote some really good books. That day she had a book-release party and was on her way there. She was all made up, going to pick up her sister to go to the event. Crossing the street, two cars crashed and then ran her over. This picture is great because she has all her makeup on and she just doesn’t look dead even though she is.

It is a beautiful and moving photograph, but I’m not sure about that last point: isn’t that a severed lump of mangled, bloody flesh in the right hand corner? Oh wait! It is indeed a freaking human being. You might want to know that the author removed the comment later on upon receiving complaints from the readers.

[Link]

The Orgasmic Persona 4 Opening Cinematic

Vodpod videos no longer available.

It’s very funny (and odd too) that a video that has zero sexual preferences can send a shiver down my spine just by gawking at it. It’s the same sensation when Star Trek geeks meet William Shatner in person, or when bitter Republicans crave to have sadistic sex with Ann Coulter. It’s disgusting, but it feels darn good. Oh Atlus, why you are so good to me?

What Would Children’s Illustrations Look Like In Real Life

Korean photographer Yeondoo Jung‘s series that recreates scenes found in children’s drawings is probably one of the most creative works I have ever seen. Some are funny, some fantastical, and some are simply surreal but all of them are beautiful. If these are indeed based on actual drawings by children, one wonders how close the photos came to the original scenes envisioned in each child’s mind.

Here are some photos along with captions I came up with.

Art #1: The Flying Witchman & The Shelf of Teacups

Art #2: My Life Is a Sitcom

Art #3: The Princess That Stands In Pink

Click Here For More

MacBook Is Thin Enough!

The Secret Of Mona Lisa’s Smile

For hundreds of years, art critics have mused over why the Mona Lisa‘s smile seems so mysterious. Now the Harvard neurobiologist Margaret Livingstone has a fascinating answer: It’s because Da Vinci painted her face in colors that play tricks on the eye.

Livingstone’s work has long examined the way that different cells in the visual system process different types of information, such as form, color, depth and movement. When she analyzed the Mona Lisa, she found that Da Vinci painted her smile almost completely in low spatial frequencies, and these are best picked up in your peripheral vision. The result, as she notes on her web site, is a nifty illusion:

These three images — [pictured above!] — show her face filtered to show selectively lowest (left) low (middle) and high (right) spatial frequencies.

So when you look at her eyes or the background, you see a smile like the one on the left, or in the middle, and you think she is smiling. But when you look directly at her mouth, it looks more like the panel on the right, and her smile seems to vanish. The fact that the degree of her smile varies so much with gaze angle makes her expression dynamic, and the fact that her smile vanishes when you look directly at it, makes it seem elusive.

Interesting, yes?